Site Master Plan Recommendations

Site Master Plan Recommendations

Site Priorities

The priority list was developed by integrating PTA, Staff, and consultant concerns gathered from meetings. 
At the second staff meeting the design team reviewed each item with the staff. Items shown in green text are items that must be completed with any work done on site. The items shown in red are items that can be moved up or down on the priority list based on site votes. The staff members received three votes to place next to their preferred objectives. The accumulation of votes led to the overall site priorities.

Below is a general description of the three categories for prioritization:

01. CODE COMPLIANCE will have to be satisfied when any work is done on site. This includes adequate bathrooms, adequate ventilation, and California energy efficiency requirements. None of these items were votable as they are all mandatory.

02. FUNCTION is the next priority category andincludes items that support the physical site and building. This includes adequate building systems such as lighting and mechanical, and appropriate low voltage and daylighting. Only basic upgrades are mandatory, other items were shown in red and can move up or down their priority category based on site votes.

03. EDUCATION SUITABILITY is the final priority category and the one most sites focused on. This category focuses on what a site and a building need to support the education curriculum. It includes items such as a fully functional science lab, a staff collaboration space, and storage rooms to remove clutter from the classrooms.

 

Ocean View ES priority votes 

 

01. CODE COMPLIANCE
Seismic/Fire and Life Safety/Accessibility

A. NEW FIRE ALARM SYSTEM 
B. NEW ELECTRICAL MAIN SERVICE AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM
C. ENERGY EFFICIENCY / TITLE 24
D. ADA ACCESS- BUILDINGS/SITE
E. FIRE SPRINKLER SYSTEM
F. FIRE ACCESS/SERVICE
G. ADEQUATE DRINKING FOUNTAINS/RESTROOMS


02. FUNCTION
Do utility systems work, water, HVAC, drains, electrical, lighting, security, etc.; Are systems standardized and maintainable? Is the envelope of the building sound (roof, windows, walls, doors, etc.)?

A. INFRASTRUCTURE

Upgrade all single pane windows, insulate CMU walls (if possible), retrofit irrigation to conform to California State Title 24 requirements, provide a canopy hood with ventilation duct to outside for kiln, replace air distribution system, replace interior lighting with energy efficient lighting, replace cooling system at MDF closet, assess piping system - repair as needed, provide shut-off valve at gas meter, modify kitchen hoods to comply with California Mechanical Code, repair
roof leaks.

B. DROP-OFF

The current parking lot creates safety issues. Reconfigure for bike and pedestrian safety.

C. SECURITY

Public access into classrooms too easy.
Intrusion alarm.

D. SITE CIRCULATION

Main path to kindergarten playground and first grade lineup gets congested. Sometimes it will take students 10 minutes to get from the play yard to classrooms. This takes away from valuable instruction time.

E. FENCES AND GATES

F. SITE IMPROVEMENTS

Lighting, skateboard racks.

G. TECHNOLOGY UPGRADES

Data network, telephone, television, clock/paging.

H. OPEN UP BREEZEWAYS

Remove problematic built-in benches.

 

03. EDUCATION SUITABILITY
Does the space meet the needs for curriculum delivery (or your facilities educational program)? This is typically classroom technology, adequacy of classroom, arts, labs and specialty spaces.

A. CLASSROOMS

Increase number, improve acoustics, improve configuration, increase daylight in some
classrooms, sinks in classrooms, more cabinets/shelves, back pack hooks.

B. ENLARGE / IMPROVE KINDERGARTEN PLAY AREA

Currently is an inadequate size.

C. REORGANIZE, IMPROVE AND IF POSSIBLE ENLARGE THE PLAYGROUND

D. PARENT ROOM

Storage, space for parent collaboration.

E. ENLARGE STAFF WORK ROOM

Currently it is an inadequate size.

F. SPECIALTY SPACES

Need more space - counseling, ELD, speech, first-aid room.

G. SCIENCE ROOM UPGRADES

Existing science room is to be upgraded to include sink and other necessary lab components.

 

 

 

Ocean View Elementary School - Master Plan Recommendations

ARCHITECTURAL

Code Compliance and Safety

Site accessibility is to be evaluated to comply with ADA guidelines. Fire access to the site is to be re-examined and truck access is to be re-designed. The buildings are to be sprinklered per current California Fire Code (CFC).

The existing electrical breaker circuit panels are to be upgraded. Install a new fire alarm system per current code.

 

Infrastructure

Modify the current irrigation system to comply with California State Title 23 requirements. Install vented canopy hoods to comply with current California Mechanical Code. Re-balance and or modify the existing distribution system.

Upgrade existing lighting to meet Title 24 energy efficiency guidelines. Upgrade existing cooling system at MDF closets to adequately cool rooms per equipment requirements. Install shut-off valve at gas meters. Install campus-wide intrusion alarm system.

 

Site

The proposed programs included “existing number of classrooms plus 1”. As a result, three options were considered at this site. For all options, site upgrades are to include campus security, play equipment (safety and location based on grade level), site lighting, and site drainage.

 

Option 1

The existing building is to be modernized per recommendations indicated above under “Code Compliance and Safety” and “Infrastructure”. The modernization is to also include seismic upgrades per Phase II seismic analysis.
Construction of a new classroom building is proposed at the north side of the campus.

The existing Day Care portable has been relocated adjacent to the Multi-Purpose Room, and the kindergarten play areas have been increased.

 

Option 2

The existing building is to be demolished, except for the Multi-Purpose Building which is to be District-owned.

The District-owned building will undergo minor modernization as indicated above.

The new buildings will be comprised of a classroom building and an administration building containing a multi-media/library center, multi-purpose room with warming kitchen and classrooms. The classroom building is two-story, and the multi-purpose building is single story. The buildings are set back on the site such that the campus is open to Jackson Street.

A lunch shelter is to be located near the multi-purpose building.

The play areas are to be reconfigured with the kindergarten play area located adjacent to kindergarten classrooms.

The play areas for the upper grade level students are located such that they are in a more open area and more easily supervised which addresses some of the security issues on the existing campus configuration.

The drop-off and parking area is reconfigured to relieve some of the traffic congestion along Jackson Street and to separate parking from drop-off.

 

Option 3

New buildings as described in Option 2, except there is no District-owned building. The buildings are configured such that the buildings’ facades face Jackson and Buchanan Streets, thus presenting a more closed campus.

Both play areas face the “inner” side of the campus and are adjacent to existing baseball/softball fields. Both play areas are easily supervised, even though they are in closer proximity to each other than in Option 2.

The drop-off has been reconfigured as in Option 2. The parking lot has been moved further into the campus thus allowing for a larger lot.

The frontage has been landscaped to present a “soft” street/curbside presence and to create a plaza-like entry.

 

CIVIL

Code Compliance and Safety

It is assumed that each of the three options presented would trigger a DSA review of the site accessibility and emergency vehicle access. Each option is discussed below in terms of Civil Engineering. All of the options would involve improvements along the project frontage to improve disabled access as well as student safety.

 

Option 1

This option would involve adding a new classroom to the north side of the campus. Because this work would disturb more than 5,000 square feet of existing improvements, all new work would be subject to C.3 requirements of stormwater treatment. The new building rooftop and all new paved surfaces would need to drain to stormwater treatment features such as bioretention areas or flow through planters.

A new private fire service would be required to provide a fire hydrant and sprinkler service for the new building. This dedicated fire line should be constructed to ultimately serve future buildouts of the campus.

ADA access on the rest of the campus would need to be improved according to the site assessment.

 

Option 2

Option 2 is a significant reconstruction of the campus that would require all new impervious surfaces to drain to stormwater treatment areas.

Because all of the new buildings would have fire sprinklers, the campus would be constructed with a new fire service.

This line would also connect to onsite fire hydrants providing coverage of the campus.

The new site would have a designated path of travel to each building per DSA requirements.

 

Option 3

Option 3 would move the campus buildings closer to Buchanan Street.

All new impervious surfaces including rooftops would be subject to C.3 requirements.

A new fire service would provide sprinklers and fire hydrants for fire protection. The campus configuration in Option 3 would provide excellent emergency vehicle access to all parts of the campus.

A designated path of travel would be required throughout the site, including accessible stalls at the new parking lot.

 

LANDSCAPE

All Options:

The following landscape improvements are recommended:

Tree plantings should buffer the campus from Buchanan Street, and between the softball field and campus.

A unique opportunity exists at Ocean View Elementary School due to its adjacency to a daylighted creek. The District should explore creation of an agreement with the University of California that would allow use of the creek as a science curriculum area. In the case of an agreement, a locked gate to the creek should be accommodated, and an accessible overlook be provided to allow participation of students who are unable to safely navigate a creek bank. A local example of a similar creek science program is in operation at John Muir Elementary School in Berkeley, California.
An orchard garden, to increase the variety of farm-to-table program opportunities, to create science curriculum opportunities through tree biology, and to provide a food garden that does not require yearly replanting.
A farm garden, consisting of raised planting beds, accessible permeable pathways, food harvest areas / curriculum gathering hubs, compost bins, worm composting stations, and cold frame or greenhouse structures to accommodate winter season gardening.

Site fencing should be pushed to the edges of District property and eliminate interaction between the public and closed campus areas.

Campus perimeter planting improvements are to replace overgrown and poorly spaced or sheared plantings. Bio?filtration planting shall be incorporated where possible to treat campus and roof runoff.

Where seating is provided, it shall be configured to encourage interaction between students and create opportunities for collaboration and functional use of outdoor areas as an extension of the classroom.

We recommend the use of non-infill synthetic play with underlying shock pads in place of pour-in-place rubber due to lower installation and maintenance costs and because it is a more versatile, attractive surface material.

Play structures shall be low maintenance, long life span structures that accommodate large numbers of children in an inclusive manner. Play elements will be age appropriate and provide a variety of physical development options. Underlying safety surfacing shall be designed to meet or exceed fall height of the structures. Play areas shall be designed to ASTM, CPSC, and ADA requirements. Play areas should be installed by or verified after installation by a certified playground safety inspector. We recommend structures such as those built by Corocord, Dynamo Play, and Elephant Play for their creative designs, high play value within a small footprint, ADA accessible designs, and durability. We recommend the use of non-infill synthetic play turf with underlying shock pads in place of pour-in-place rubber due to lower installation and maintenance costs and because it is a more versatile, attractive surface material.

Where blacktop is striped for games, the striping shall be laid out to avoid overlaps in use that could lead to playground injuries.

Typically, landscape improvements shall comply with DSA and California Building Code requirements, including CALGreen, District directives, and Title 23 Irrigation Efficiency requirements.

Paved areas shall be designed for universal access.

Concrete paving shall utilize a mix of fly ash and slag replacing approximately 50% of Portland cement in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, provide a significant level of recycled material content in the paving, and increase the strength of the finished paving, thereby increasing its durability and lifespan. Concrete shall be non-slip broom or soda wash finish in order to reduce install cost and construction clean up, and will not have lamp black added, to ensure that the paving remains high-albedo and reduce the urban heat island effect over the long-term.

Where appropriate, asphalt paving shall be color coated with high-albedo, slip resistant surface treatments to provide visual interest and reduce urban heat island effect while maintaining usefully large, contiguous paved areas.

Plantings shall be climate appropriate, low water use native and adapted non-invasive exotic plants. Where possible, mowed lawn should be replaced with native, non-mowed meadow, significantly reducing irrigation and maintenance.

Irrigation systems shall be weather aware, automatically adjusted to reduce waste, and meet or exceed state and local irrigation efficiency requirements.

We recommend that although not required, the nine Bay-Friendly Landscape basic practices be followed in order to further reduce irrigation use and maintenance costs, and to protect the local environment. Landscape maintenance staff should be trained in Bay-Friendly Landscape practices. District maintenance practices should incorporate Bay?Friendly Landscape practices which reduce water use, strive to eliminate pesticide and chemical fertilizer use, and tend to reduce landscape maintenance costs. The nine Bay-Friendly practices are:

    1. All soil on site is protected with a minimum of 3 inches of mulch after construction.
    2. Compost is specified as the soil amendment at the rate indicated by a soil analysis to bring the soil organic matter content to a minimum of 3.5% by dry weight or 1-2 inches of compost. If the imported or site soil meets the organic content of 3.5% or more, then the requirement is waived.
    3. Divert 50% of landscape construction and demolition waste by weight. Verify the local jurisdiction’s minimum requirement and reporting procedures for construction and demolition (C&D).
    4. Select and plant vegetation to allow for natural size and shape growth. Pruning for structural integrity and overall health is permissible. Plants adjacent to buildings or established in a row should allow for their minimum and maximum growth potential, according to a reference plant book.
    5. Do not plant invasive plant species.
    6. Grow drought tolerant California native, Mediterranean or climate adapted plants.
    7. A maximum of 25% of total irrigated area is specified as turf, with sports or multiple use fields exempted.
    8. Specify water-based irrigation controllers (automatic, self-adjusting) that includes a moisture and/or rain sensor shutoff.
    9. Sprinkler and spray heads are not specified for areas less than 8 feet wide.

 

Option 1

A science garden replacing the existing concrete amphitheater, representing the California ecosystems, and that incorporates an outdoor classroom area with creek overlook.

 

Option 2 and Option 3

A creek/native ecosystem/science garden space including an outdoor classroom area, creek overlook, and interpretive signs that incorporate science curriculum elements. If possible, modification of the existing fencing at the adjacent daylighted creek edge should be pursued to increase visual access to the creek.

 

STRUCTURAL

Option 1

The existing building would be retrofitted, with the retrofit program primarily consisting of reinforcing the wall to roof connection at each building. The connections would generally consist of a Simpson “holdown” type bracket bolted to the wood framing and masonry walls at a regular spacing around the perimeter of the buildings. In addition, certain existing plywood shear walls would be reinforced through the addition of plywood or foundation bolts and certain roof collector connections would be reinforced.


The new classroom building could be a wood framed structure with the roof consisting of plywood sheathing over prefabricated I-joists and glu-lam beams. Walls would be wood framed with lateral forces resisted by plywood shear walls. The ground floor would be a concrete slab on grade over conventional shallow foundations.

 

Option 2

The existing multi-purpose building would be retrofitted, with the retrofit program primarily consisting of reinforcing the wall to roof connection at each building. The connections would generally consist of a Simpson “holdown” type bracket bolted to the wood framing and masonry walls at a regular spacing around the perimeter of the buildings. In addition, certain existing plywood shear walls would be reinforced through the addition of plywood or foundation bolts and certain roof collector connections would be reinforced.

The replacement building could be either a wood or steel framed structure. If the building is wood framed the floors and roofs could consist of plywood sheathing over prefabricated I-joists and glu-lam beams. Walls would be wood framed with lateral forces resisted by plywood shear walls. If the building is steel framed the floor and roof decks would consist of concrete topped metal decks supported by steel beams, girders, and columns. Lateral forces would be resisted by steel braced frames. The ground floor would be a concrete slab on grade over conventional shallow foundations.

 

Option 3

The new buildings could be either wood or steel framed structures. If the buildings are wood framed the floors and roofs could consist of plywood sheathing over prefabricated I-joists and glu-lam beams. Walls would be wood framed with lateral forces resisted by plywood shear walls. If the building is steel framed the floor and roof decks would consist of concrete topped metal decks supported by steel beams, girders, and columns. Lateral forces would be resisted by steel braced frames. The ground floor would be a concrete slab on grade over conventional shallow foundations.

 

 

MECHANICAL / PLUMBING

All mechanical options will require a new energy management control system based on the new code requirements.

Plumbing Recommendations: Change plumbing fixtures with new water conservation type plumbing fixtures. In addition, replace the main domestic hot water heater which has exceeded its useful service life with new.

 

Option 1

Mechanical Option 1: For the new single-story classroom building, provide packaged rooftop air handling unit similar to the rest of the campus. Since the existing packaged rooftop units still have half of their useful life, reuse existing packaged air handling units that are functional and replace the ones that warrant replacement.

Mechanical Option 2: Provide heating hot water condensing boilers with primary-secondary pumping system and piping distribution system. Replace all existing packaged rooftop units with new air handling units with heating coils and economizers to use more outside air when the outdoor temperature condition is right. No cooling system for the classrooms but provide cooling for the administration, multi-media/library center, and multi-purpose areas.

Air Distribution (ductwork, air inlets and outlets): Replace all existing air distribution with new.

 

Option 2

Mechanical Option 1: Provide packaged rooftop air handling units for the entire campus.

Mechanical Option 2: Provide heating hot water condensing boilers with primary-secondary pumping system and piping distribution system per each new building and provide air handling units with heating coils and economizers. Provide air handling unit with cooling for the administration area, multi-media/library center, and multi-purpose areas.

 

Option 3

Mechanical Option 1: Provide floor or ceiling mounted indoor air handling units with economizers and ductwork for each classroom. Provide heating hot water condensing boilers with primary-secondary pumping system and piping distribution system. Provide air handling unit with cooling for the administration area, multi-media/library center, and multi-purpose area. No cooling for the classrooms.

Mechanical Option 2: Same as Option 1 but using outdoor air handling units.

Mechanical Option 3: Provide packaged rooftop air handling units.

 

ELECTRICAL

Option 1

Required Code Compliance and Safety

    1. Provide an automatic fire alarm system to meet current code requirements. The existing system does not meet current codes.

Recommended Safety Improvements

    1. Replace existing security camera system with a new system that meets current industry quality and standards.
    2. Provide an intrusion alarm system with door contacts and motion sensors throughout the site.
    3. Provide additional exterior security lighting throughout site.

Recommended Upgrades

    1. Replace existing interior and exterior lighting systems with new energy efficient fixtures and multi-switching controls to meet current Title 24 requirements.
    2. Update existing power receptacles in all spaces to meet current ADA height requirements.
    3. Provide wireless data drops throughout the site.
    4. Install projector system in all classrooms to conform with what has been done on the other campuses.
    5. Replace existing main switchboard with new main switchboard to accommodate new building feeders and electrical loads if the budget allows. If the budget does not allow for new service, the new building could be added to the existing service with a new breaker in the existing space or by bus tapping to feed a new disconnect if the existing space inside the switchboard is not large enough to allow a larger breaker size.

 

Option 2

Required Electrical and Low Voltage Work

    1. Demolish all existing electrical and low voltage systems on the site.
    2. Provide new PG&E, Comcast, and AT&T services to site.
    3. Provide new power, lighting, clock/paging, intrusion alarm, security camera, data, and fire alarm systems to the new buildings.
    4. Provide upgraded lighting, power, clock/paging, data/telephone, intrusion alarm, and fire alarm systems to modernized multi-purpose building.

 

Option 3

Required Electrical and Low Voltage Work

    1. Demolish all existing electrical and low voltage systems on the site.
    2. Provided new PG&E, Comcast, and AT&T services to site.
    3. Provide new power, lighting, clock/paging, intrusion alarm, security camera, data, and fire alarm systems to the new buildings.

Edited: Sara, 5/14/2014
Published: Sara, 5/14/2014